Why Bats are Beneficial

Our new lineup of products includes the Beneficial Bat House. Why “beneficial”? Because there are many ways that bats help gardeners and farmers. It’s worth the effort to welcome bats to your yard.

The Beneficial Bat House will accommodate about 30 bats.

Our new lineup of products includes the Beneficial Bat House. Why “beneficial”? Because there are many ways that bats help gardeners and farmers. It’s worth the effort to welcome bats to your yard.

Nina Fascione, executive director of Bat Conservation International, says that bats are primary predators of night-flying insects, including many of the most damaging agricultural pests, as well as bugs that bedevil backyard gatherings. A single little brown bat can eat up to 1,000 mosquito-sized insects in a single hour. The millions of Mexican free-tailed bats at Bat Conservation International’s Bracken Cave in Texas eat up to 200 tons of insects each summer night. And a favorite target is an especially damaging insect called the corn earworm moth. Scientists recently estimated that bats save American farmers at least $3.7 billion (and perhaps as much as $53 billion) a year in reduced crop damage and pesticide use.

Learn More

Read All About Bats to learn how to attract bats — and why. All based on research from the experts at Bat Conservation International.

And by the way, only three bat species are vampires and they’re all in Latin America. Vampire bats really do feed on blood, although they lap it like kittens, rather than sucking it up as horror movies suggest. And even the vampires are useful: an enzyme in their saliva is a powerful blood-clot dissolver that is used to treat human stroke victims.

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4 Responses to Why Bats are Beneficial

  1. Pavel says:

    Thanks for sharing the benefits of bats. I had only heard of the benefits of certain insects such as ladybugs, but not bats.

    Unfortunately we don't have bats in Australia, where I live and obviously have my garden. The odd flying fox, but they absolutely love eating fruit like apples and peaches, so not-so-beneficial. 🙂

  2. h2e says:

    You didn't mention that certain bats are pollinators! although maybe that species wouldn't use your bat house, I don't know.

  3. Anonymous says:

    My son-in-law would like to have a bat house. Are they recommended for residential areas?

  4. Bat houses are fine in residential areas. I recommend reading the article, All About Bats. That way you can see if there's a way to site the house properly. The article gives specifics on the best positioning for a bat house.

    David Grist, Gardener's Supply

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