Monthly Archives: June 2011

Black Magic

As I looked for flowers to complement some marigolds in a container planting, I stumbled upon Black Magic violas, the blackest flower I’ve ever seen. Most “black” flowers are very dark purple, but Black Magic is a pure matte black. … Continue reading

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Pesticide Ban Milestone

Should your local government have the right to tell you what you can and cannot spray on your lawn and garden? Last month marked a milestone in that debate. Twenty years ago, Hudson, a town just outside Montreal, passed a … Continue reading

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Caterpillars First, then Butterflies

If you want to attract butterflies, it’s important to think about caterpillars. My favorites, the moths, begin life as caterpillars, too. Start by choosing plants that will provide food for the hatching caterpillars. This is a promethea moth (woodland moth) … Continue reading

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Spring Forward

In many parts of the country, it’s been a rough spring for gardeners. Our hearts go out to the small farmers who are trying to make a go of it despite nature’s challenges. We’d like to share this inspiring post … Continue reading

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Our Support Team

Every year toward the end of May, there comes a day when I can sit back and admire the gardens I care for — whether my own, or my gardening clients — and give myself a little pat on the … Continue reading

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Funds for Flood Victims

Like much of the nation, Vermont has been faced with extreme weather this spring: flooding, hail, high winds and more. Lake Champlain is at an all-time high, causing devastating floods along the shore. This week, we’re joining singer Jamie Lee … Continue reading

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Speaking Up for Pollinators

I’m always surprised that not everyone knows about the decline of pollinators, such as bees, bats and moths. Of the estimated 240,000 flowering plants worldwide, 91 percent require an insect or animal to distribute their pollen to set fruit and … Continue reading

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